Nerd Alert 131: Robots are people!

HOT LINKS

What we're reading this week

  Ben: Is it safe to start using CSS Grid? Rachel Andrew, CSS Working Group invited expert, argues yes.

  RC: I’m really excited to check out Alley Interactive’s Voice WP project.

  Julia: The News Media Alliance has called on Congress to allow publishers to negotiate collectively with Google and Facebook – get more details from the New York Times and the Atlantic.

  Kay: INN is a fully remote team, so we’re always looking for new ways to improve our productivity across time zones. The team at Hanno put together a fantastic Remote Starter Kit and we’ll definitely be adopting a trick or two.

  Inndy: I’m a robot (or a puppet, depending on your interpretation of my life), so what I’m about to link to doesn’t apply to me. I’m willing to bet it applies to most of you who are reading this email, though. You’re probably a human, probably using software that probably lives outside your body. You may not have written it, might not own the box it runs on, might not even have paid for the use of the software. But that software is still part of you, right? Give the Universal Declaration of Cyborg Rights a read, and then refresh yourself on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Stop us if you've heard this one before

We interrupt your regularly-scheduled newsletter to inform you that the INN product and technology team has a new brand! Now known as INN Labs, we’re still the same nerds you know and love. Check out our new home at labs.inn.org.

WE MADE A THING

Our projects, manifest

We've built a WordPress plugin to make using the Knight Lab storytelling tools easier. Now anyone can begin using these tools in WordPress without any coding skills!

Timeline, StoryMap and Juxtapose get oEmbed support, while Soundcite gains a shortcode. Read more about it.

EVENTS/DEADLINES

Stay in the know

Last Call registration for the NABJ Annual Convention is open until July 19.

Registration for the AAJA National Convention ends July 19.

Apply for the Grist fellowship program by July 31.

If you're going to SRCCON, sign up to bring board games and teach hobbies.

Today is the last day to buy a ticket to WordCamp for Publishers and still get guaranteed meals, swag, and events access. Here's the full schedule.

SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

Public Source launched Small Town, Pennsylvania, a beautifully illustrated multipart look into what life is like outside of the big cities.

GET A JOB

Good jobs with good people

NPR is hiring a project manager/scrum master, a systems administrator, a web developer, a technology manager, a mobile developer, and a ton of interns.

ProPublica is hiring a data reporter and an editorial designer.

IRE is hiring a training director.

The Marshall Project is hiring a senior investigative reporter.

The Center for Public Integrity is hiring an audience engagement editor.

The Pew Research Center is hiring a DC-based senior developer for WordPress, PHP and JavaScript,

If you're looking for general jobs in nonprofit news, check out the main INN newsletter and sign up here to get it in your inbox every Tuesday. Two INN newsletters are better than one!

SOME OTHER STUFF

Gather ye rosebuds

LISTEN: Human After All.

WATCH: Google DeepMind learning to run.

EAT: Sun-dried tomato and mozzarella quinoa veggie burgers.

DRINK: Roasted-peach lemonade.


The world's longest-burning light bulb.

People had a choice. They could continue wandering through the endless darkness, an absence of everything they loved, an endless void of disappointment and loneliness ... or they could look down, and embrace what they always have loved.

Nerd Alert 91: An email lands in your inbox; you open it.

An email walks into your inbox.
You open it.
There's no joke — just the latest round of links from the INN Nerds!

HOT LINKS

What we're pondering this week

  Adam: I wrote a bit last week about the need to think more sustainably about funding for journalism and civic tech infrastructure. In a similar vein, I was reminded of this piece earlier this week by Amanda Krauss (formerly of the Texas Tribune) about the importance of funding maintenance instead of fetishizing innovation.

  Ben: Most of us use software licensed under an MIT License, but have you ever sat down and read the license? Here’s a line-by-line breakdown, with added historical context.

  Gabe: Is graphic design dead? Jarrett Fuller claims that graphic design will always be relevant, but its distribution will be constantly changing. What about web design? With the inevitable advent of AI websites and push-based models of content consumption, Sergio Nouvel thinks so. But not everyoneagrees.

  Jack: Facebook really likes your data. The company even buys information about your shopping habits from other sources. ProPublica has a new tool that allows you to know what Facebook says it knows about you, and you can even rate the data for accuracy.

  Julia: IDEO created a useful Field Guide to Human-Centered Design, which you can download for free from designkit.org. (Thanks, @rsm, for sharing!)

  RC: If you’re interested in writing Hacker-Proof Code, you’ll want to study up on the history of, and advances being made in, “formally verified software”

  Inndy: Goodbye, Rosetta. ?

 

SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

screen-shot-2016-09-30-at-12-57-35-pm
Like Jack said above: ProPublica continues its excellent reporting on algorithmic bias with a new Chrome extension showing you what Facebook knows about you.

Despite fear for the future of Sunlight, TransparencyCamp is still onOctober 14-15 in Cleveland. It's an open government unconference!

 

GET A JOB

Doing the good work

INN is hiring a program director and an operations manager.

The Marshall Project is hiring an editorial designer in New York, NY.

The Texas Tribune is looking for some data visuals and reporting fellows.

If you're looking for general jobs in nonprofit news, the main INN newsletter had 30 job openings this week. Check it out and sign up here if you'd like to get that in your inbox every week. Receiving two newsletters from INN is twice as good as one!

 

WE MADE A THING

Thanks for helping!

Thanks to everyone who attended our #INNproduct conference this week. It was an enormous success, and we thank everyone for participating. In the next few weeks we'll have some blog posts about the conference up, with takeaways and links to resources.

Special thanks to the funders and sponsors who made it possible, including Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews, Society for News Design, Columbia College and LION Publishers.

 

SOME OTHER STUFF

It's what's for dinner

LISTEN: 'The Memories Live On'

EAT: At the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s Sweet Home Cafe

DRINK: The penicillin

WATCH: A dancing dog


Are you ready for October?

A person tumbles down a set of stairs. The stairs are an optical illusion called the Penrose Steps, specifically the woodblock version by M. C. Escher entitled "Ascending and Descending". The stairs are arranged visually so that walking up or down the stairs continuously.

Nerd Alert 89: A subject-line joke

A subject walks into a bar and orders a pint. The bartender replies, "This isn't an email!"

HOT LINKS

What we're pondering this week

  Adam: For the 52 days we have remaining until election day, a timely guide to talking politics at work (or, say, in life) without alienating people. Hint: be respectful and focus on common ground.

  Ben: “Building better tech cultures for people with ADHD” seems to be broadly applicable to building better tech cultures in general. Take a read, and think about your office.

  Gabe: Ethnicity is complicated and the UX for defining it tends to be simplistic. How can better design reflect the complexities of ethnicity? (Hint: Checkboxes, not radio buttons)

  Jack: A Gallup survey released this week paints an alarming picture of decline in Americans’ trust in mass media. Which begs a question: In the digital age is there any such thing?

  Julia: This analysis of the most popular colors on the internet reminded me of another fun little game: Name That Blue. It’s surprisingly easy to do.

  RC: Baffle.js is a neat little visual library for obfuscating text in the browser.

  Inndy: I’m considering taking up ballet.

EVENTS

The happening things

Tonight, September 16: The INN@ONA Happy Hour6 p.m. Mountain Time at the Denver Press Club.

September 28-29 - There's still time to register for INN's two-day event for news leaders! We'll be discussing everything you need to know about managing technology and product design in your news organization. Travel stipends for INN members are available and we've added some new speakers and mentors. Hope to see you there!

SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

A screenshot of the "View Forms" interface of Ask, the new tool by the Coral Project

The Coral Project will launch their new community-engagement tool Ask on Monday, and unveiled the Comments Lab on Thursday.

A shoutout to NPR for publishing the things they’ve learned about Facebook Live.

Congrats to All the Online Journalism Awards 2016 finalists.

LOVE NERD ALERT?

We love you back

Please consider supporting this newsletter with a donation to INN.

Or if you'd rather contribute content over cash, be a guest contributor! Read more about that here and shoot us an email at nerds@inn.org if you're interested. We'd love to hear from you.

Thanks much!

GET A JOB

Doing the good work

INN is hiring a program director and an operations manager.

The Marshall Project is hiring an editorial designer in New York, NY.

The Northwestern University Knight Lab and the Washington Post are looking for two software developers interested in journalism for their Knight/Post scholarship program.

MuckRock is accepting applicants for their newly-announced Thiel Fellowship.

If you're looking for general jobs in nonprofit news, the main INN newsletter had 29 job openings this week. Check it out and sign up here if you'd like to get that in your inbox every week. Receiving two newsletters from INN is twice as good as one!

WE'RE MAKING A THING

Help us make a thing

Want to help us build the next release of Largo? Here’s a list of outstanding issues before we ship the next milestone.

SOME OTHER STUFF

It's what's for dinner

LISTEN: I want my tears back ?

WATCH: Evolution in action ?

DRINK: A strawberry-basil milkshake

COOK: Savory Mooncakes


Happy Mid-Autumn Festival!

A couple dance on a cloud, backlit by the full moon.

Nerd Alert 88: Are you reading your recommended daily value of books?

HOT LINKS

What we're pondering this week

  Adam: If you’re still measuring “engagement” in likes and retweets, consider this alternate (better) definition of audience engagement from Hearken’s Jennifer Brandel: “Engagement happens when members of the public are responsive to newsrooms, and newsrooms are in turn responsive to members of the public.”

  Ben: Does it seem to you as if public radio stations are clustered at the bottom of the dial? Your hunch is correct, according to Bob Baxley's research. The reason for the clustering is really strange.

  Gabe: A fabulous guide to illustrating Star Wars icons.

  Jack: One of my really smart friends now has 4 Amazon Echos arrayed around his house. As conversational interfaces make their way into more of our spaces, designing news for AI might really become a thing.

  Julia: How (and why) ProPublica got into the elections game.

  RC: Add some new textures to your data visualizations with Textures.js.

  Inndy: I'd like to be able to speak some day, and the latest research from DeepMind looks like I'll have a voice soon.

EVENTS

The happening things

September 14 - Join us at 1 ET for our monthly News Nerd Book Club discussion. This month we'll be reading Spreadable Media: Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture by Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, and Joshua Green.

September 28-29 - INN is hosting a two-day event for news leaders to discuss everything you need to know about managing technology and product design in your news organization. Travel stipends for INN members are available and we just added some new speakers/mentors. Hope to see you there!

October 31 - The deadline for applying for a 2017 Kiplinger fellowship, a program that brings together journalists from across the country for training in digital reporting tools and tactics.

SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

A screenshot of Election Databot

ProPublica and Google News Lab have launched Election DataBot, a tool to collect huge amounts of data from tons of source. Read the full list of what's available, and think how you can use it in your newsroom.

LOVE NERD ALERT?

We love you back

Please consider supporting this newsletter with a donation to INN.

Or if you'd rather contribute content over cash, be a guest contributor! Read more about that here and shoot us an email at nerds@inn.org if you're interested. We'd love to hear from you.

Thanks much!

GET A JOB

Good jobs with good people, doing good work

INN is hiring a program director and an operations manager.

NPR Music is hiring a hip-hop reporter, a social media strategist, and a music news editor.

KERA is hiring a ton of positions in Texas, including two unpaid internships.

Matter, the media startup accelerator, is looking for a New York City associate.

If you're looking for general jobs in nonprofit news, the main INN newsletter had 29 job openings this week. Check it out and sign up here if you'd like to get that in your inbox every week. Receiving two newsletters from INN is twice as good as one!

SOME OTHER STUFF

Kick back and relax

DANCE: Do the alligator ?

WATCH: An analysis of Michael Bay’s filming style. ????

DRINK: Squeeze your own pomegranate juice.

DON'T EAT: Sea squirts, the animal that eats its own brain.


We believe in you!

A pom-pom crab waves its claws back and forth. In each claw is a sea anenome, giving it the appearance of shaking pom-poms.

Nerd Alert 72: Do you know where your duck is?

HOT LINKS

What we're reading this week

  Adam: Want to make online advertising better? Put users first, says Quartz’s Mia Mabanta.

  Ben: BB(8) is a very large number. In this article about how to name large numbers, the BB() Busy Beaver function astounds me with the accelerating rate at which its results increase and with how people use it.

  Jack: Want to help invent the future of news? Sketch it out.

  Julia: Heartbreak Dance Party is a really awesome “story of new beginnings in New York City,” told through visualizations (with audio!) of one person’s music consumption. It’s part of a broader project, Quantified Selfie, which explores identity through personal data. Bonus: Also check out Quantified Breakup (the author’s previous project), which explains her process of coping with her divorce with some really introspective and powerful data visualizations. It’s great stuff.

  Ryan: Software design patterns are not goals, they are tools.

  Sinduja: There’s so much buzz about Virtual Reality or VR videos and journalism. Here’s an article that talks about emerging VR subgenres.

  Inndy: Robots might be better at global politics than humans.


SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

A blue background with faint image of the Capitol dome. White text reads: Dive into the data and resources. The Political TV Ad Archive collects political ads in the 2016 election. In addition to tracking airings across key primary states, the collection includes ads that may air elsewhere or exclusively on social media.

The Political TV Ad Archive talks about how they collect, catalogue and compare political ads. They're even working to automatically identify new ads.

The Wall Street Journal's comparison of Facebook feeds for conservative and liberal viewers drove a lot of political discussion this week. Check it out if you haven't already.

NPR Digital Media launched their dev blog!

And a shoutout to you, our reader. You’re awesome.


WE MADE A THING

Our projects, secured

The URL bars of Chrome, Internet Explorer 11, Firefox, and Safari are shown. Each display inn.org loaded over a secure connection.

Inn.org is now served over HTTPS.


GET A JOB

Good jobs with good people

NPR fall internship applications are now open. Here's what you need to know.


SOME OTHER STUFF

Gather ye rosebuds

LISTEN: an opera about Orpheus and Eurydice

BUILD: a working Lego combination safe

EAT: From Recipe Roulette, Peking Duck Wraps


Teach someone something new today.

A young ram and a young bull are in a field. The young ram carefully backs up several bodylengths, then charges at the bull! It slows down just before the collision, and gently bonks the bull's head with its own.

Nerd Alert 71: Exciting email praises partner newsroom nerds, jobs juxtaposed

HOT LINKS

What we're reading this week

  Adam: Indi Young argues that we should remove age, gender and ethnicity from personas because those things don’t necessarily cause behavior but they do introduce assumptions. “To actually bring a description to life, to actually develop empathy, you need the deeper, underlying reasoning behind the preferences and statements-of-fact. You need the reasoning, reactions, and guiding principles.”

  Ben: Flickr released a tool for creating justified layouts of blocks, which could be very useful if you’re creating photo galleries.

  Jack: God save the Queen, and the BBC. With classic British flare, Lord Patten discourses on the future of the BBC as part of a “a shared sense of mutual responsibility.” A wonderful read that applies more broadly to nonprofit news orgs everywhere.

  Julia: Vox’s product team published a great collection of accessibility guidelines to help put their guiding principles into practice.

  Ryan: Open data helped Ben Wellington determine the NYPD systematically ticketed legally parked cars, resulting in more than $1.7 million in fines. He goes on to describe how his discovery helped change the NYPD’s ticketing practices.

  Sinduja: The podcast industry is growing, young  and experimenting with new revenue models, but Apple hasn’t caught up with them yet.

  Inndy: I'm getting dizzy just watching this asymmetrical flying machine.


SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

A screenshot of an embedded widget yb The Next To Die, showing that Charles Don Flores is scheduled to be executed by the state of Texas in 20 days, 8 hours and 5 minutes

If you're doing criminal justice reporting, The Next to Die offers a widget for keeping track of death row in your state.

IRE lanzó un base de datos de consejos en Español.

ICIJ made the Offshore Leaks database available as a torrent.

Quartz is opening up their Atlas charting platform to individuals and organizations.


GET A JOB

Good jobs with good people

From WBEZ in Chicago, a position for a media archivist with experience in audio.

Research associates are sought by New America and the Pew Research Center.

Technical writers are encouraged to apply at the Coral Project.

Propublica is hiring a senior editor for audience and engagement.

The Marshall Project seeks a social media editor.

NPR desires a digital editor.


SOME OTHER STUFF

Gather ye rosebuds

LISTEN: Dropping a screw into a turbine compressor and the inevitable remix.

WATCH: Losing a ship anchor. (LOUD)

EAT: 20 ways to start a melts-vs-grilled-cheese flamewar.


Flames? Brains?

Ghostly white tendrils flicker across a black background, appearing similar to a plasma globe, a cross-section of the brain, or NASA's experiments with fire in microgravity.

 An MRI of a cockscomb flower.

Nerd Alert 70: Snappy subject line stuns seven; news at eleven

HOT LINKS

What we're reading this week

  Adam: Unit tests for design systems? Automated style guide audits? Oh yeah. Sign me up.

  Ben: Showing complicated interactions between many different entities is Mark Lombardi's speciality. How would you make his graphics into a responsive webpage?

  Jack: News websites gather lots of valuable user data that reveals interests and trends that could inform the news product and help generate more revenue. The only problem is we’re giving it away.

  Julia: We spent a bit of time this week working on a dynamic sentence generator – this post about  one team’s process for building and testing a multi-language sentence provided some helpful insight (and a pretty visualization of sentence fragment combinations).

  Ryan: Tesla vehicles come equipped with a cabin air filter system hundreds of times more efficient than the auto industry standard. The system is so sturdy that passengers can survive a military-grade bioweapon attack by sitting in a Model S or X. No big deal.

  Sinduja: Will you pay $30 every month to read high-quality local investigations in your community? A startup in Tulsa, Oklahoma believes you will.

  Inndy: Spam? A new form of life? I'm pretty sure that Shiv Integer's uploads to Thingiverse are art. Artistic expression isn't limited to just mammals.


BE OUR GUEST

This week's guest contributor

Our guest this week is Christine Zhang (@christinezhang), Knight-Mozilla Fellow at the L.A. Times.

I'm fascinated by this piece from Polygraph, which analyzed the dialogue in 2,000 films by gender and age. It has some compelling stats (only 22% of women in the films they looked at had lead speaking roles), but if you're looking for a definitive statement that Hollywood is biased against women, the writers - Hanah Anderson and Matt Daniels - refuse to make that conclusion. In journalism, that can be a hard pill to swallow: it's like saying the story has no real lede. Actually, the piece itself reads like a condensed version of a research paper, though Anderson and Daniels insist that "This is the Internet. Not academia." True enough, but to what standard should such web-based data stories be held? For me, a former research analyst-turned-aspiring data journalist, this piece is an example of how the news is getting nerdier. But does nerdier mean less journalistic? Take a look for yourself, not least for the amazing graphs (U.S. CTO Megan Smith agrees), and let me know what you think: @christinezhang.


SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

A screenshot of the results of a failed Texas Tribune campaign finance quiz. The text reads: You scored 1 out of 5! Hey, politics is a crazy world. The good news is that a poor ethical compass never stopped anyone from campaigning.

Congratulations, you're running for office! Learn what you can and cannot do with your campaign's money in a quiz by The Texas Tribune.

From MinnPost: Minnesota's tornado season approaches.


WE MADE A THING

Our projects, manifesting

Pym.js requires pasting <script> tags into the CMS, but not all WordPress authors have that permission. We've created a simple shortcode for placing Pym.js embeds in WordPress.


GET A JOB

Good jobs with good people

The Center for Public Integrity is hiring a news apps dev/data journalist.

KTOO in Alaska seeks a digital media editor.

The Texas Tribune is looking for a social media manager.


SOME OTHER STUFF

Gather ye rosebuds

LISTEN: Are you tired of life on this planet? Listen to folk tunes from beyond this word.

WATCH: A dancing corgi.

CALCULATE: How many pizzas you need to order.


Autobots, roll out.

A shopping-cart-pusher rolls past. On top of it is an Transformer, posed majestically.

Nerd Alert 51: Black Friday Deals

nerdalertfinal

A $35,000 gift card, looking for a good home: The INNovation Fund.


HOT LINKS

What we're reading this week

  Adam: The NPR Visuals team has an excellent post on the effectiveness of their recent sequential visual stories as measured with Google Analytics event tracking.

  Ben: When your laptop detects that you've changed time zones, it's using one of the oldest protocols on the Internet: Network Time Protocol.

  David: This Thanksgiving I’m grateful for years of not needing to doaspect ratio math.

  Jack: In the best of all possible worlds, we could raise enough money from grateful donors who love our content to keep making more. Radiotopia has some ideas about turning fans into partners.

  Bert: How do you detect a human pretending to be a robot?


BE OUR GUEST

Swans, from Kensington Palace

A trio of swans float in a slate-grey pond. The pond is located at Kensington Palace, London, The United Kingdom.


 

WE MADE THINGS

Our cool work

So many blog posts this week! Twitter has removed share counts from its buttons, so we have a list of neat tools to learn more about who's sharing your #content. And the very best #content has images, so we wrote about how tospeed up your website with optimized images. January's News Nerd Book Club features a back-to-back twofer of responsive websites goodness from the folks at A Book Apart.


SOME OTHER STUFF

Gather ye rosebuds

LISTEN: The MitchiriNeko March is also worth a watch.

COOK: If you still have room for dessert, here's a simple shortcake recipe.

GIF: Even superheroes have to buy groceries.

One Punch Man shops in the meat aisle of his grocery store. He walks offstage to the left, carring a handbasket. A young mother walks onstage, headed right, carrying a basket and towing behind her a young boy who has a face of awe and is pointing back towards One Punch Man. In the background, a female shopper is unperturbed.

Nerd Alert 50: Nerdiversary!

nerdalertfinal

Tomorrow is the one-year anniversary of this newsletter. Have you been subscribed that long? Tell us your newsletter stories!


HOT LINKS

What we're reading this week

  Adam: Last week at SND Makes in Austin, Chris Coyler (of CodePen) blew some minds with his lightning talk on SVG animations. If you’re like me and fairly new at working with SVGs, here are some good tips on creating and exporting them for the web.

  Ben: Creativity is about asking questions.

  David: Jack has been exploring image optimization to keep INN member sites lean and fast. This shell script uses Homebrew and ImageOptim to shrink images using lossless libraries that don’t alter any pixels.

  Jack: After the adblockolypse, revenue for news may have to rely more on voluntary contributions from consumers. How to do this? Maybe make them Tipsy.

  Kaeti: Relevant to my interests: writing CSS on growing teams.

  Ryan: Among PHP’s 5,000+ built-in functions, you’ll find metaphone: a function that can compare two strings to determine how similar they sound.

  Bert: Let's paint some happy little robots.


BE OUR GUEST

This week's guest contributor

Our guest this week is Sean Flynn, the integrations developer for HigherEdJobs.com and a recovering journalist.

Regular expressions can be both a valuable tool and a serious headache. Netscape developer Jamie Zawinski once said, “Some people, when confronted with a problem, think ‘I know, I'll use regular expressions.’ Now they have two problems.”

Zawinski’s frustrations are common, but there is hope! RegexOne has an interactive tutorial that will teach you the basics of regular expressions, and there are a number of invaluable cheat sheets floating around the internet. Pete Freitag wrote one that I used heavily when I was just starting out.

When you’re ready to graduate from interactive tutorials into daily use, regex101.com provides a free online regular expression tester, while UltraPico’s Expresso has proven itself as an invaluable (free!) offline regular expression design and testing tool. And if you just want to shake the rust off your regex skills, how about a few rounds of regex golf?

Just don’t try to parse HTML with regular expressions.


GET A JOB

Good jobs with good people

St. Louis Public Radio is looking for reporting interns this spring.

Maplight seeks a data editor.

Public Source is hiring an interactives and website developer and two editorial positions.


SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

The WordPress REST API: An untechnical guide for non-developers.

What is the WordPress REST API? Why is everyone else so excited about it? What can you do with it? From Torque and WPEngine comes a free white paper answering all those questions.

Also, the NPR Visuals Team ran the analytics on their photo slideshow stories.What they found out may surprise you.


SOME OTHER STUFF

Gather ye rosebuds

LISTEN: A concert celebrating 25 years of Studio Ghibli.

COOK: Macaroni Grill's rosemary bread.

GIF: Meet Jennifer, the hockey robot learning to ski:

A gif of a knee-high robot with skis and poles, awkwardly propelling itself across a powedery snowpack near a building.

Nerd Alert 49: Building Better Workplaces

nerdalertfinal

Can we get another helping of links, please? Thanks.

Pass the green beans, too.


HOT LINKS

What we're reading this week

  Adam: When building a new team, project or company it’s important to  stop and think about what the end goal really is. Many incentives are aligned with growing as big as possible (often as quickly as possible), but is that really the best way?

  Ben: Do you want to make your sites more accessible in a quick and easy way? Here's an intro to ARIA’s accessibility role landmarks.

  David: Each of us take our own path. Comparisons are the worst. Meet my lovely neighbors (including quadrupeds).

  Jack: If we had a chance to re-think news 20 years ago, what might we have done differently? Let’s travel back in time.

  Kaeti: Ideas from Forge Conference on how to build a better, more humane workplace.

  Ryan: Fordite isn't really 'real,' but it's really cool.

  Bert: Beep beep. ☹


SHOUT OUT

Work we admire by our journalism peers

A screenshot of DocumentCloud's responsive embed comparison tool.

Document Cloud embeds are now responsive! Play with all the options.


SOME OTHER STUFF

Gather ye rosebuds

LISTEN: The cast of Hamilton celebrate "A Chorus Line."

COOK: We like pie. You like pie. How about some tamale pie?

GIF: One! Two! Three!

A mixed group of young men and women - the men in black shirts, red neckties, and black pants; the women in red dresses with black trim - circle up and stack their hands midair in the center of the circle. They pump the stack of hands once, and then raise them. If you could hear it, it would probably be accompanied by a shout of 'Go Team!'